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Pedestrian critically injured in Reno County

Mon, 05/15/2017 - 07:41

RENO COUNTY, Kan. (KSNW) – A man was struck in the middle of K-96 early Monday in Reno County.

The Reno County Sheriff’s Office says they were called around 2 a.m. to an area about one mile west of Haven on K-96.

They found a man in the middle of the road. A motorist said they did not see the man and attempted to swerve from hitting him.

A portion of the highway was closed but has since reopened.

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Categories: Local KSN News

Log in, look out: Cyber chaos may grow at workweek’s start

Mon, 05/15/2017 - 06:42

LONDON (AP) — Employees booting up computers at work Monday could see red as they discover they’re victims of a global “ransomware” cyberattack that has created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear.

As a loose global network of cybersecurity experts fought the ransomware hackers, officials and experts on Sunday urged organizations and companies to update older Microsoft operating systems immediately to ensure they aren’t vulnerable to a more powerful version of the software — or to future versions that can’t be stopped.

The initial attack, known as “WannaCry,” paralyzed computers that run Britain’s hospital network, Germany’s national railway and scores of other companies and government agencies worldwide in what was believed to be the biggest online extortion scheme so far.

Microsoft blamed the U.S. government for “stockpiling” software code that was used by unknown hackers to launch the attacks. The hackers exploited software code from the National Security Agency that leaked online.

The company’s top lawyer said the government should report weaknesses they discover to software companies rather than seek to exploit them.

“An equivalent scenario with conventional weapons would be the U.S. military having some of its Tomahawk missiles stolen,” attorney Brad Smith wrote on Microsoft’s blog.

New variants of the rapidly replicating worm were discovered Sunday and one did not include the so-called kill switch that allowed researchers to interrupt its spread Friday by diverting it to a dead end on the internet.

Ryan Kalember, senior vice president at Proofpoint Inc. which helped stop its spread, said the version without a kill switch was able to spread but was benign because it contained a flaw that wouldn’t allow it to take over a computer and demand ransom to unlock files. However, he said it’s only a matter of time before a malevolent version exists.

“I still expect another to pop up and be fully operational,” Kalember said. “We haven’t fully dodged this bullet at all until we’re patched against the vulnerability itself.”

The attack held users hostage by freezing their computers, popping up a red screen with the words, “Oops, your files have been encrypted!” and demanding money through online bitcoin payment — $300 at first, rising to $600 before it destroys files hours later.

The ransomware attack was particularly malicious, because if just one person in an organization clicked on an infected attachment or bad link, all the computers in a network would be infected, said Vikram Thakur, technical director of Symantec Security Response.

“That’s what makes this more troubling than ransomware was a week ago,” Thakur said.

It hit 200,000 victims across the world since Friday and is seen as an “escalating threat,” said Rob Wainwright, the head of Europol, Europe’s policing agency.

“The numbers are still going up,” Wainwright said. “We’ve seen that the slowdown of the infection rate over Friday night, after a temporary fix around it, has now been overcome by a second variation the criminals have released.”

The effects were felt around the globe, disrupting computers that run factories, banks, government agencies and transport systems in nations as diverse as Russia, Ukraine, Brazil, Spain, India and the U.S. Britain’s National Health Service was hit hard, while Russia’s Interior Ministry and companies including Spain’s Telefonica, FedEx Corp. in the U.S. and French carmaker Renault all reported disruptions.

Chinese media reported that more than 29,000 institutions in the country had been hit, with universities and other educational entities the hardest hit, along with railway services and retailers. Japanese broadcaster NTV reported 600 companies in that country had been hit, and automaker Nissan and the Hitachi conglomerate said they were addressing the problem at their units that were affected.

The full extent of the attack won’t become fully clear until people return to their workplaces Monday, for the first time after the attacks. Many may click infected email attachments or bad links and spread the virus further.

“It’s this constant battle,” said Ryan O’Leary, vice president of WhiteHat Security’s threat research center. “The bad guys are always one step ahead.”

The White House held emergency meetings Friday and Saturday to assess the global cyber threat, a White House official said Sunday. No details were disclosed. The official was not authorized to discuss the private meetings by name and requested anonymity.

It was too early to say who was behind the onslaught, which struck 100,000 organizations, and what their motivation was, aside from the obvious demand for money. So far, not many people have paid the ransom demanded by the malware, Europol spokesman Jan Op Gen Oorth told The Associated Press.

Researchers who helped prevent the spread of the malware and cybersecurity firms worked around the clock during the weekend to monitor the situation and install a software patch to block the worm from infecting computers in corporations across the U.S., Europe and Asia.

“Right now, just about every IT department has been working all weekend rolling this out,” said Dan Wire, spokesman at Fireeye Security.

Businesses, government agencies and other organizations were urged to quickly implement a patch released by Microsoft Corp. The ransomware exploits older versions of Microsoft’s operating system software, such as Windows XP.

Installing the patch is one way to secure computers against the virus. The other is to disable a type of software that connects computers to printers and faxes, which the virus exploits, O’Leary added.

Microsoft distributed a patch two months ago that could have forestalled much of the attack, but in many organizations it was likely lost among the blizzard of updates and patches that large corporations and governments strain to manage.

“It’s one of those things, in a perfect world, if people were up to date on the patches, this wouldn’t be a problem,” O’Leary said. “But there are so many things to patch. The patch lists can be ginormous. It can be tough to tell which patch is important, until it is too late.”

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Rugaber reported from Washington. AP writers Brian Melley in Los Angeles, Catherine Lucey in Washington, Allen G. Breed in Raleigh, North Carolina, and AP Technology Writer Anick Jesdanun in New York contributed to this report.

Categories: Local KSN News

Wichita food bank opens in time for summer demand

Mon, 05/15/2017 - 06:37

WICHITA, Kan. (KSNW) – After two years of planning, fundraising and renovations, the new United Methodist Open Door food distribution center is open to the public.

The new facility located at 2130 21st St. in Wichita officially opened Tuesday, April 25, but tonight, the organization will host an open house for the donors who made the opening possible.

Open Door Open House will start at 4 p.m. and go through 6:30 p.m.

It took a $2.75 million capital campaign to turn what was formerly a Cessna Aviation training facility into the new food distribution center that is necessary to keep up with demand, according to Jeremy Kindy, development director for United Methodist Open Door.

“The two facilities we had were on north Mosley. They were older and very well-worn buildings,” Kindy said. “We had been in there for over 30 years. We had worn out the facilities and it was time to get us into a more sustainable facility that we could use long term for the community.”

United Methodist Open Door serves about 400 food boxes each week, Kindy said. Those boxes go to people in the community who have a residence but live in poverty.

While the winter months tend to see a high volume of people in need of service, the summer months see another round of needs from the community, Kindy said.

“When school gets out we will see an upturn as well because families will start not having free breakfast and lunch programs,” he said. “So they will start looking for more food options as well for their kids.”

As a result, the opening of the new distribution center couldn’t come at a better time.

“I’m particularly proud of the way in which the community embraced this project,” Kindy said. “We had a lot of donors across various businesses, individuals, and I think the community came together to make this facility a reality.”

Donations are accepted on site from 9 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Monday through Friday. For more information, click here.

Categories: Local KSN News

‘Deadwood’ actor Powers Boothe dies at 68

Mon, 05/15/2017 - 06:36

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Powers Boothe, the character actor known for his villain roles in TV’s “Deadwood,” and in the movies “Tombstone,” ”Sin City” and “The Avengers,” has died. He was 68.

Boothe’s publicist said he died of natural causes at his home in Los Angeles on Sunday.

Fellow actor Beau Bridges tweeted the news and called him “a dear friend, great actor, devoted father and husband.”

Boothe won an Emmy in 1980 for playing cult leader Jim Jones in the TV movie “Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones.” The ceremony was held amid an actors strike, and Boothe was the only acting winner to show up for his award.

“This is either the most courageous moment of my career or the stupidest,” he quipped after accepting the prize.

He went on to play other memorable antagonists, including ruthless saloon owner Cy Tolliver in “Deadwood,” the gunman Curly Bill Brocius in “Tombstone” and a corrupt senator in “Sin City.” More recently he appeared as Gideon Malick in 2012’s “The Avengers” and ABC’s “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”

Peter MacNicol, who acted alongside Boothe on Fox’s “24,” tweeted Monday that Boothe was a great, old school actor whose every word on camera “sounded like a first time utterance.”

Born to a farming family in the west Texas town of Snyder, Boothe eventually left for New York to pursue an acting career. He told The Associated Press in 1981 that he made ends meet at first by working in a Broadway restaurant and eventually found theater roles, but his family was always ready to welcome him back.

“They kept telling me, ‘Come home and we’ll have a place for you on the farm,'” he said.

A private service will be held in his native Texas.

___

This story has been corrected to reflect the accurate spelling of the actor’s last name in the headline.

Categories: Local KSN News

KSN Threat Tracker for Monday, May 15, 2017

Mon, 05/15/2017 - 06:32

6:00AM Warm and windy this afternoon, It’s starting to feel a little like summer.

5:00AM We’re in for a really warm and windy afternoon. We’ll start off in the mid 60s and with partly cloudy skies and pretty gusty S winds all afternoon we’ll warm into the 80s by lunch time and top off in the upper 80s to low 90s through the afternoon. Join us on Kansas Today this morning because we’re talking about a return of storms, some of those could be on the severe side.

Categories: Local KSN News

North Korea: New long-range missile can carry heavy nuke

Mon, 05/15/2017 - 06:24

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea on Monday boasted of a successful weekend launch of a new type of “medium long-range” ballistic rocket that can carry a heavy nuclear warhead. Outsiders also saw a significant technological jump, with the test-fire apparently flying higher and for a longer time period than any other such previous missile.

Amid condemnation in Seoul, Tokyo, Washington and Moscow, a jubilant North Korean leader Kim Jong Un promised more nuclear and missile tests and warned that his country’s weapons could strike the U.S. mainland and Pacific holdings.

North Korean propaganda must be considered with wariness — Pyongyang has threatened for decades to reduce Seoul to a “sea of fire,” for instance — but Monday’s claim, if confirmed, would mark another big advance toward the North’s goal of fielding a nuclear-tipped missile capable of reaching the U.S. mainland. Some experts, including officials in Tokyo, estimate that Sunday’s launch successfully tested a new type of missile, potentially the longest in North Korea’s arsenal.

The test is also an immediate challenge to South Korea’s new president, Moon Jae-in, a liberal elected last week who expressed a desire to reach out to North Korea. Pyongyang’s aggressive push to boost its weapons program also makes it one of the Trump administration’s most urgent foreign policy worries, though Washington has struggled to settle on a policy.

North Korea’s official Korean Central News Agency called the missile a “new ground-to-ground medium long-range strategic ballistic rocket,” and said the “Hwasong-12” was “capable of carrying a large, heavy nuclear warhead.”

Kim witnessed the test and “hugged officials in the field of rocket research, saying that they worked hard to achieve a great thing,” according to KCNA.

The rocket, “newly designed in a Korean-style,” flew 787 kilometers (490 miles) and reached a maximum altitude of 2,111 kilometers (1,310 miles), the North said, and “verified the homing feature of the warhead under the worst re-entry situation and accurate performance of detonation system.”

South Korea’s Defense Ministry said more analysis is needed to verify the North’s claim on the rocket’s technological features. Spokesman Moon Sang Gyun said it’s still unlikely that North Korea has re-entry technology, which would return a warhead safely back into the atmosphere.

Japanese officials said Sunday that the missile flew for half an hour and reached an unusually high altitude before landing in the Sea of Japan.

Several South Korean analysts, including Lee Illwoo, a Seoul-based commentator on military issues, said the missile flew higher and for a longer period than any other the North has ever test-fired. North Korea has also launched satellites into orbit on long-range rockets that share some of the same technology as missiles.

North Korea is not thought to be able yet to make a nuclear warhead small enough to mount on a long-range missile, though some outside analysts think it can arm shorter-range missiles with warheads. Each new nuclear and longer-range missile test is part of the North’s attempt to build a nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missile.

Kim said North Korea would stage more nuclear and missile tests in order to perfect nuclear bombs needed to deal with U.S. “nuclear blackmail.”

State media paraphrased North Korea’s leader as saying that “the most perfect weapon systems in the world will never become the eternal exclusive property of the U.S.,” warning that “the U.S. should not … disregard or misjudge the reality that its mainland and Pacific operation region are in (North Korea’s) sighting range for strike.”

The launch complicates the new South Korean president’s plan to talk to the North, and came as U.S., Japanese and European navies gather for joint war games in the Pacific.

“The president expressed deep regret over the fact that this reckless provocation … occurred just days after a new government was launched in South Korea,” senior presidential secretary Yoon Young-chan said. “The president said we are leaving open the possibility of dialogue with North Korea, but we should sternly deal with a provocation to prevent North Korea from miscalculating.”

Moon, South Korea’s first liberal leader in nearly a decade, said as he took his oath of office last week that he’d be willing to visit North Korea if the circumstances were right.

In Seoul, some citizens expressed frustration.

Kim Do-hoon, 31, said that South Korea, while keeping the “door open for conversation” with the North, should also “show a stern attitude at some level.”

“As South Korea’s diplomatic situation matures, North Korea should also show a more mature attitude, not a childish one, and contribute to (establishing a better) diplomatic relationship,” said Jin Hyo-seon, 33, a painter.

The U.N. Security Council will hold closed consultations about the launch on Tuesday afternoon, according to the U.N. Mission for Uruguay, which holds the council presidency this month.

The U.S. ambassador to the U.N., Nikki Haley, said on ABC television that the United States has been working well with China, Pyongyang’s closest ally, and raised the possibility of new sanctions against North Korea, including on oil imports.

The Security Council has adopted six increasingly tougher sanctions resolutions against North Korea.

President Donald Trump’s administration has called North Korean ballistic and nuclear efforts unacceptable, but it has swung between threats of military action and offers to talk as it formulates a policy.

While Trump has said he’d be “honored” to talk with leader Kim under favorable conditions, Haley seemed to rule out the possibility. “Having a missile test is not the way to sit down with the president, because he’s absolutely not going to do it,” she told ABC.

The U.S. Pacific Command said Sunday’s test flight “is not consistent with an intercontinental ballistic missile.”

David Wright, co-director of the Global Security Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists, said the missile could have a range of 4,500 kilometers (about 2,800 miles) if flown on a standard, instead of lofted, trajectory — considerably longer than North Korea’s current missiles. He said Sunday’s launch — the seventh such firing by North Korea this year — may have been of a new mobile, two-stage liquid-fueled missile North Korea displayed in a huge April 15 military parade.

The White House, in a statement, said that North Korea has been “a flagrant menace for far too long.”

Russian President Vladimir Putin condemned the missile launch, telling reporters during a visit to China that “there’s nothing good about” it.

The Russian defense ministry said the missile landed several hundred kilometers away from the city of Vladivostok in Russia’s Far East, but Putin said it “didn’t present a threat” to his country.

The launch came as troops from the U.S., Japan and two European nations gather near Guam for drills that are partly a message to North Korea. The USS Carl Vinson, an aircraft supercarrier, is also engaging with South Korean navy ships in waters off the Korean Peninsula, according to Seoul’s Defense Ministry.

___

Associated Press writer Hyung-jin Kim contributed to this report.

Categories: Local KSN News

Government scientist from DC wins Miss USA title

Mon, 05/15/2017 - 06:19

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Kara McCullough, a scientist working for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, has been crowned Miss USA.

McCullough, who represented the District of Columbia in the decades-old pageant, was born in Naples, Italy, and raised in Virginia Beach, Virginia. She said she wants to inspire children to pursue careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

“I love science,” McCullough said after the Sunday event. “I look at this as a great opportunity to … get to experience worldwide culture, as well as just having the opportunity to be impacted by so many children, hopefully in the math and sciences.”

McCullough bested 50 other contestants and will represent the U.S. at the Miss Universe contest.

This was the second year in a row that the representative of the nation’s capital won the Miss USA title. Last year, District of Columbia resident Deshauna Barber became the first-ever military member to win Miss USA.

This year’s top five finalists were asked questions that touched on the pros and cons of social media, women’s rights and issues affecting teenagers. McCullough was asked whether she thinks that affordable health care for all U.S. citizens is a right or a privilege. She said it is a privilege.

“As a government employee, I’m granted health care and I see firsthand that for one to have health care, you need to have jobs.”

McCullough said she will be discussing with her supervisor whether she will take a leave of absence from her job at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission during her one-year reign.

Miss New Jersey Chhavi Verg, who studies marketing and Spanish at Rutgers University, was the runner-up at the event held at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center on the Las Vegas Strip.

Verg was one of five women who participated in the pageant who told The Associated Press they immigrated to the U.S. with their families at a young age. Verg and the women representing Florida, North Dakota, Hawaii and Connecticut described the challenges and opportunities they faced as immigrants.

Verg told The AP that she and her parents immigrated from India to the U.S. with only $500 in their pockets when she was 4 years old. Her first winter she did not have a winter coat and the family struggled to adjust.

“I want to show Americans that the definition of what it means to be American is changing,” the 20-year-old said. “It’s not just one face. There are many different people who are Americans, and I feel like Asian-Americans often times are left out of the conversation.”

The contestants’ remarks contrast with the controversy that surrounded the pageant in 2015, when then-part owner and now U.S. President Donald Trump offended Hispanics when he made anti-immigrant remarks in announcing his bid for the White House.

Trump co-owned The Miss Universe Organization with NBCUniversal, but the network and the Spanish-language broadcaster Univision quickly cut ties with him, refusing to air the show. Trump sued both networks, eventually settling and selling the pageant to talent management company WME/IMG.

Categories: Local KSN News

Thursday at 10: Harvesting the Wind

Mon, 05/15/2017 - 01:01

(KSNW) — Amidst a challenging economy, Kansas farmers are looking for ways to make ends meet.

With ever changing technology, farmers are beginning to harvest a different kind of crop — the wind.

For some it’s an alternate way to pay the bills, and for others, it’s additional income.

Join us Thursday at 10 as we look into Harvesting the Wind.

Categories: Local KSN News

Wichita State wins series vs Evansville

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 23:53

WICHITA, Kan. – Wichita State used a 12-hit attack to defeat Evansville 8-4 in game three of the series.

Alec Bohm went 2-for-4 with three RBI and a double, while Greyson Jenista went 2-for-3 with an RBI.

Starter Robby Evans went 4.1 innings and gave up two runs on three hits with two walks and five strikeouts.

Greyson Jenista led off the first with a single and Alec Bohm followed with a one-out walk. Willie Schwanke singled up the middle to drive in Jenista for a 1-0 lead.

In the third, Jordan Boyer led off with a double and scored on a single from Jenista for a 2-0 lead.

The Aces tied it in the fifth. Craig Shepherd led off with a double and moved to third on a flyout. Brendan Krob’s single drove in Shephard and Nate Reeder and Troy Beilsmith followed with singles to tie the game at two.

Bohm’s RBI double gave the Shockers a 3-2 lead in the fifth and Jacob Katzfey’s RBI squeeze bunt pushed the lead to 4-2 in the sixth.

Categories: Local KSN News

Legislators on day 90: plan for budget, school finance outcomes soon

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 23:26

WICHITA, Kan. (KSNW) – Kansas lawmakers are nearing the end of the legislative session but two big things remain on the to-do list. 

“We can’t go home without two things: a school finance formula and a budget. So there will be an agreement. Are we close to that today? No. But we’re eliminating bad ideas so I think we’re making some progress,” Rep. Jim Ward (D)-Wichita said. 

Lawmakers are technically on day 90 of the legislative session and Ward says the state has budgeted for 100 days. 

KSN asked Rep. Chuck Weber (R)-Wichita about the pressures of a looming deadline. 

” I think the court and the people of Kansas want us to get this right. So I don’t personally feel a deadline persay, I think we just need to get this right,” Weber said. 

That includes a factor of accountability, according to Weber. 

“Right now there are no consequences for a failure of a new plan. There’s no accountability. My question is, I’m okay spending more money, but what are we going to get, what are taxpayers going to get, for spending more of their money for education?” Weber said. 

When lawmakers examine school financing formulas, they have to consider the achievement gap: one in four Kansas children are not reaching proficiency in reading or math. 

“The House K-12 committee is pulling together a formula that’s 90 percent where we need to get to,” Ward said. 

Look to KSN for updates on the announcement of a school funding formula and budget plan for the state. 

Categories: Local KSN News

Sunday night shooting hospitalizes one

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 22:44

WICHITA, Kan. (KSNW) – Wichita police responded to a shooting near Harry and Fern streets around 9 p.m. on Sunday.

The shooting reportedly left one victim in critical condition, requiring transportation to a local hospital.

Police called it a “crowd situation” upon arrival but have since got the scene under control.

“We had a disturbance, that led to a shooting,” Sgt. Carlton E. Rogers said.

KSN News expects to learn more at a police briefing Monday.

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The Latest: N.Korea says missile can carry nuclear warhead

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 20:15

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Latest on North Korea’s missile launch (all times local):

9:10 a.m. Monday

North Korea says the medium long-range strategic missile it tested over the weekend can carry a nuclear warhead.

The country’s official Korean Central News Agency says the missile fired Sunday Korea time was a Hwasong-12 “capable of carrying a large-size heavy nuclear warhead.”

The South Korean, Japanese and U.S. militaries say the missile flew for half an hour and reached an unusually high altitude before landing in the Sea of Japan. Tokyo says the flight pattern could indicate a new type of missile.

Japanese officials say the missile flew for about 30 minutes, traveling about 800 kilometers (500 miles) and reaching an altitude of 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles).

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11:25 p.m.

The Trump administration seems to be throwing cold water for now on the idea of talks with North Korea.

A top North Korean diplomat had said on Saturday — a day before the latest missile test from the North — that her country would be willing to meet with the Trump administration for negotiations “if the conditions are set.”

And earlier this month, President Donald Trump seemed to open the door to talks when he said he’d be “honored” to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

But Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, told ABC’s “This Week” on Sunday that “having a missile test is not the way to sit down with the president, because he’s absolutely not going to do it.”

Haley said that Kim “can sit there and say all the conditions he wants. Until he meets our conditions, we’re not sitting down with him.”

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8 p.m.

Italian Premier Paolo Gentiloni says the G-7 summit his country is hosting later this month will discuss how to deal with the risk North Korea’s missile launchings pose to global security.

Gentiloni, who is visiting China and Russia this week, recommended a response of “firmness,” which he suggested should be “predominantly economic.” He urged an approach of diplomacy, noting that Italy could play a role since it heads the U.N. sanctions committee.

Referring to North Korea’s latest ballistic missile test, conducted on Sunday, Gentiloni said in Beijing that “you must not consider these things as local bizarreness or strangeness.”

The Italian leader said that “it’s a serious problem for global stability and security, and I’m convinced that the upcoming G-7, in friendship, will contribute to resolving this issue.”

The summit, in Sicily, is May 26-27.

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3:35 p.m.

China’s foreign ministry has expressed opposition to North Korea’s test-launch of a ballistic missile and called on all sides to exercise restraint.

A Ministry spokeswoman, Hua Chunying, said in a statement Sunday faxed to The Associated Press that the situation on the Korean peninsula is “complex and sensitive.”

Hua says countries “should not do things that further escalate tensions in the region.”

In Beijing, Chinese President Xi Jinping told his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin that their countries are both playing an “important role as a balancing power” in world affairs by seeking a peaceful way out for of the crises in Syria and the Korean Peninsula.

China, North Korea’s most important ally and key provider of food and fuel aid, has sought to cool tensions over Pyongyang’s nuclear and missile programs, repeatedly calling for dialogue.

Shen Dingli, a professor of international relations at Fudan University in Shanghai, says North Korea conducted the test to show its “determination to develop nuclear weapons and missiles remains unchanged.”

___

1:15 p.m.

Japan’s Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida says he and his South Korean counterpart have agreed that dialogue for dialogue’s sake with North Korea is meaningless in the wake of Pyongyang’s latest missile test.

Kishida says he and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se shared the view that dialogue is important for resolving the North Korean tensions. They also acknowledged the importance of the role China is playing in its dealings with its North Korean ally.

Kishida says the international community should prioritize efforts to implement the existing U.N. Security Council resolutions barring North Korea’s missile and nuclear technology more thoroughly. He says Japan and the U.S. also started discussing the sanctions on North Korea, but did not elaborate.

Experts have said the sanctions have been largely ineffective because North Korea still has trade and investment with China and Russia.

Kishida says: “We need to keep studying what could be the most effective while monitoring how North Korea would respond.”

___

12:30 p.m.

Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said he and South Korean President Moon Jae-in discussed by phone North Korea’s latest missile test, while his top national security adviser also spoke with his U.S. counterpart.

Abe says “Japan is closely cooperating with the U.S. and South Korea and analyzing the situation as we firmly respond to the development.”

It was his second appearance before reporters Sunday after North Korea fired the missile that Japanese officials say may have been a new type given its flight time and unusually high altitude.

Abe added that the three countries also seek to cooperate with China and Russia to pressure North Korea to comply with U.N. Security Council resolutions to stop further missile and nuclear tests.

___

Noon

The White House says President Donald Trump “cannot imagine that Russia is pleased” with North Korea’s latest missile test because the missile landed so close to Russian soil.

In a statement issued Saturday night, the White House press secretary points out that the missile landed closer to Russia than to Japan.

The White House says North Korea has been “a flagrant menace for far too long.” And it says South Korea and Japan have been watching this situation closely with the U.S.

The statement says the U.S. maintains its “ironclad commitment” to stand with its allies in the face of the serious threat posed by North Korea. And the White House says the latest “provocation” should serve as a call for all nations to implement far stronger sanctions against the North.

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10:50 a.m.

Japan’s defense minister says the missile test-fired by North Korea might have been a new type given the altitude and duration of its flight.

Defense Minister Tomomi Inada told reporters there is a possibility that it was a new type of ballistic missile, saying it flew Sunday for about 30 minutes and an altitude exceeding 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles). She says more analysis was needed.

Earlier, Japanese officials said the missile landed in the Sea of Japan but outside the country’s exclusive economic zone.

South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in has strongly condemned the launch, saying there was still the possibility of dialogue with North Korea but that Seoul would deal sternly with any such provocations.

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10:20 a.m.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in has strongly condemned rival North Korea’s missile test-launch as a “clear” violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions and a “serious challenge” to international peace and security.

According to senior presidential secretary Yoon Young-chan, Moon expressed “deep regret” over the fact this “provocation” occurred just days after a new government was sworn in in South Korea.

Yoon quoted Moon as saying South Korea is “leaving open the possibility of dialogue with North Korea, but we should sternly deal with a provocation to prevent North Korea from miscalculating.”

___

9:35 a.m.

Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga says the missile test-fired by North Korea flew 800 kilometers (500 miles) for about 30 minutes and landed in the Sea of Japan, but not inside Japan’s exclusive economic zone.

He says there are no reports indicating there was any safety impact on aircraft and ship transport.

He says the missile was not flying toward Japan and that the country did not launch a safety alert system.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told reporters Sunday that the launch, which is banned by the United Nations, is “absolutely unacceptable” and that Japan will respond resolutely.

He says officials are studying possible implications of the launch that came days after South Korea’s new president took office and an international conference is being hosted by China.

Japan also lodged protest to North Korea over the missile launch through the Japanese Embassy in Beijing.

Categories: Local KSN News

Jeter’s No 2 retired by Yanks; Monument Park plaque unveiled

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 19:38

NEW YORK (AP) – Derek Jeter’s No. 2 has been retired by the New York Yankees, who dedicated a plaque in his honor that will be placed in Monument Park behind center field.

Jeter captained the Yankees during much of a 20-year career that ended in 2014 and included five World Series titles and a New York-record 3,465 hits.

He is the 22nd player to have his number retired by New York, by far the most among major league teams, and he was the last to wear a single-digit number.

Jeter picked Mother’s Day for the ceremony, and his grandmother, parents, sister, nephew and pregnant wife joined him at Yankee Stadium on Sunday.

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Man shot and killed after allegedly breaking into a home

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 17:34

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) – Authorities are investigating the death of a man who was shot after allegedly breaking into a home.

The Kansas City Star reports the shooting was reported shortly before 4 a.m. Sunday in a Kansas City, Missouri, neighborhood.

Police say a resident of the home shot the man who allegedly broke into the home. The wounded man died at the scene.

Investigators took the resident into the station for questioning.

A second resident of the home was also wounded, but had only minor injuries.

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In testing missile, N. Korea challenges South’s new leader

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 17:16

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Just five days after South Korea elected a president who expressed a desire to reach out to North Korea, Pyongyang sent a challenge to its rival’s new leader on Sunday by test-firing a ballistic missile.

The missile flew for half an hour and reached an unusually high altitude before landing in the Sea of Japan, the South Korean, Japanese and U.S. militaries said. Tokyo said the flight pattern could indicate a new type of missile.

The launch jeopardizes new South Korean President Moon Jae-in’s willingness for dialogue with the North, and came as U.S., Japanese and European navies gather for joint war games in the Pacific.

“The president expressed deep regret over the fact that this reckless provocation … occurred just days after a new government was launched in South Korea,” senior presidential secretary Yoon Young-chan said. “The president said we are leaving open the possibility of dialogue with North Korea, but we should sternly deal with a provocation to prevent North Korea from miscalculating.”

Moon, South Korea’s first liberal leader in nearly a decade, said as he took his oath of office last week that he’d be willing to visit the North if the circumstances were right.

The U.N. Security Council said Sunday it will hold urgent consultations on North Korea’s latest ballistic missile test at the request of the United States, Japan and South Korea. Uruguay holds the council presidency this month and its U.N. Mission announced the closed consultations will be held on Tuesday afternoon.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley said on ABC television’s George Stephanopolous show Sunday that the U.S. has been working well with China, Pyongyang’s closest ally, and she raised the possibility of new sanctions against North Korea including on oil imports.

The Security Council has adopted six increasingly tougher sanctions resolutions against North Korea

U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration has called North Korean ballistic and nuclear efforts unacceptable, but he has swung between threats of military action and offers to talk as it formulates a policy.

While Trump has said he’d be “honored” to talk with leader Kim Jong Un under favorable conditions, his administration on Sunday seemed to throw cold water on the idea of talks with North Korea.

“Having a missile test is not the way to sit down with the president, because he’s absolutely not going to do it,” Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, told ABC’s “This Week.”

She said it was time to “send a strong, unified message that this is unacceptable, and I think you’ll see the international community do that.”

While it wasn’t immediately clear what type of missile was launched, the U.S. Pacific Command said that “the flight is not consistent with an intercontinental ballistic missile.”

North Korea’s past satellite rocket launches have been called clandestine tests of ICBM technology, but it is not believed to have tested a true intercontinental ballistic missile yet.

Japanese officials said the missile flew for about 30 minutes, traveling about 800 kilometers (500 miles) and reaching an unusually high altitude of 2,000 kilometers (1,240 miles).

David Wright, co-director of the Global Security Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists, said the missile could have a range of 4,500 kilometers (about 2,800 miles) if flown on a standard, instead of a lofted, trajectory — considerably longer than Pyongyang’s current missiles. He said Sunday’s launch — the seventh such firing by North Korea this year — may have been of a new mobile, two-stage liquid-fueled missile North Korea displayed in a huge April 15 military parade.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told reporters that the launch was “absolutely unacceptable” and that Japan would respond resolutely. Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida said he and his South Korean counterpart agreed that “dialogue for dialogue’s sake with North Korea is meaningless.”

The White House took note of the missile landing close to Russia’s Pacific coast and said in a statement that North Korea has been “a flagrant menace for far too long.”

The statement said Washington maintains its “ironclad commitment” to stand with its allies in the face of the serious threat posed by North Korea. The latest “provocation” should serve as a call for all nations to implement far stronger sanctions against the North, it said.

Outside militaries and experts will closely analyze what the North fired. While Pyongyang regularly tests shorter-range missiles, it is also working to master the technology needed to field nuclear-tipped missiles that can reach the U.S. mainland. Past North Korean missiles have flown farther than Sunday’s test, landing closer to Japan, but this launch follows a series of high-profile failures.

Japanese Defense Minister Tomomi Inada said North Korea might have launched a “new type of missile,” given the altitude and duration of its flight. But she said more analysis was needed.

Inada’s remarks suggest the missile might have been on a “lofted” trajectory, meaning it could have a far longer range than it actually flew. Japan’s Kyodo News agency, citing unidentified sources, said the missile may be capable of covering a range as far as 4,000 kilometers (2,500 miles) if launched at a normal trajectory.

Italian Premier Paolo Gentiloni said the G-7 summit his country is hosting later this month would discuss how to deal with the risk North Korea’s missile launchings pose to global security.

“It’s a serious problem for global stability and security, and I’m convinced that the upcoming G-7, in friendship, will contribute to resolving this issue,” he said in Beijing.

South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement that the missile was fired early Sunday morning from near Kusong, in North Phyongan province.

The North’s state media said Saturday that the nation would bolster its nuclear capability unless the United States abandons its hostile policy.

“The United States should never expect us to give up our nuclear capability,” the main Rodong newspaper said in a commentary carried by the Korean Central News Agency. It said Trump’s “maximum pressure and engagement” policy is only aimed at “stifling us” and will compel the North to “strengthen our nuclear deterrent at the maximum speed.”

The launch came as troops from the U.S., Japan and two European nations gather near Guam for drills that are partly a message to North Korea. The USS Carl Vinson, an aircraft supercarrier, is also engaging with South Korean navy ships in waters off the Korean Peninsula, according to Seoul’s Defense Ministry.

On Saturday, a top North Korean diplomat in charge of U.S. relations, Choe Son Hui, told reporters in Beijing that Pyongyang would be willing to meet with the Trump administration for negotiations “if the conditions are set.” She did not elaborate.

___

Associated Press writers Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo and Frances D’Emilio in Rome contributed to this report.

Categories: Local KSN News

Martin Truex Jr. living sublimely after Kansas Speedway win

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 16:56

KANSAS CITY, Kan. (AP) — Joe Garone thought he’d seen Martin Truex Jr. lose in every conceivable way at Kansas Speedway, whether it was pit strategy or bad restarts or a bizarre problem during a late tire change that did in his chances of winning last season.

Then, he watched Erik Jones — the other car in their two-car Furniture Row Racing stable — go for a spin late in Saturday night’s race, forcing a restart after Truex had established a big lead.

“I was like, ‘Here’s a new way to lose it,'” said Garone, the team’s president. “The 77 is going to do it for us.”

Only this time, things worked out in the end.

Truex roared away from Ryan Blaney and Kevin Harvick on a late restart, then did it again when Jimmie Johnson spun out with two laps to go. And after so many fits at Kansas Speedway, Truex and the Furniture Row Racing team had finally found their way to victory lane.

“I’m not going to lie to you: As a racer, you don’t forget,” Truex said. “You don’t forget those days, the ones that got away or you screw up and gave one away or anything like that. You never forget those. They always stick with you.”

Truex called last year “the biggest heartbreaker,” when he had several seconds on the field and came in to pit with 54 laps to go. The stop went flawlessly save for the right front tire, which was on crooked and causing an intense shaking because of a bolt that got jammed behind it.

“To have the craziest thing happen that you could ever imagine — an eight-second lead just gone. I don’t remember where we finished because it was so heartbreaking,” Truex said. “I feel like it’s been a long time coming, and we definitely earned it, that’s for sure.”

Indeed, Furniture Row Racing has earned just about everything it has gotten.

The only team headquartered west of the Mississippi, Barney Visser’s two-car outfit has managed to challenge powerhouse teams such as Hendrick and Penske with regularity. It survived money problems and poor results early on, thanks primarily to dogged determination, and slowly built itself to the point where established drivers such as Kurt Busch were taking the team to the front.

Truex came aboard before the 2014 season, when Busch headed to Stewart-Haas Racing, and rookie crew chief Cole Pearn’s arrival the following year sent the team on an upward trajectory.

Truex reached victory lane once in 2015 and made the final four at Homestead, finishing fourth in the championship race. And he finished second at the season-opening Daytona 500 and won four times last season, including a stretch of three wins in five races late in the year.

His other win? The Coca-Cola 600, where Truex led a record 392 of 400 laps.

“The first year with Martin, as you know, was pretty tough. We didn’t know exactly what we had, and he didn’t know exactly what he had, and it’s just been golden ever since,” Visser said. “He is definitely the pick, when we lost Kurt, that Cole and Joe and all the guys wanted, and we were able to land him. He’s just been outstanding. You saw it (Saturday night) on those restarts.

“He drove like a champion, and that’s where we think we’re headed. That’s the goal,” Visser said with a smile. “And we’ve got a driver that can do it.”

Truex has been the model of consistency this season. He was eighth at Atlanta before winning the following week at Las Vegas, then ran fourth a couple weeks later at California. He also had back-to-back eighth-place runs at Texas and Bristol and was in the top 10 at Richmond.

In fact, the only time he’s finished outside the top 16 this season came at Talladega, when a late-race wreck ended his day. Otherwise, he’s been right in the mix at every stop.

He’s just 44 points behind Kyle Larson in the standings, and he joined Johnson and Brad Keselowski as the only drivers with multiple wins this season.

“The last two years have just been — it’s just every weekend has had that feeling,” Truex said. “I know that we’ve been in position to win a lot of races. I’ve had a couple of the greatest years of my career with this team and I just can’t wait to show up at every racetrack.”

___

More AP racing: http://racing.ap.org

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5 ways to become a smaller target for ransomware hackers

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 16:36

An online extortion attack that authorities say swept 150 countries this weekend is part of a growing problem of “ransomware” scams, in which people find themselves locked out of their files and presented with a demand to pay hackers to restore their access.

Hackers bait users to click on infected email links, open infected attachments or take advantage of outdated and vulnerable systems.

Lawrence Abrams, a New York-based blogger who runs BleepingComputer.com, says many organizations don’t install security upgrades because they’re worried about triggering bugs, or they can’t afford the downtime.

Here are five tips to make yourself a less-likely victim:

MAKE SAFE AND SECURE BACKUPS

Once your files are encrypted, your options are limited. Recovery from backups is one of them. “Unfortunately, most people don’t have them,” Abrams says. Backups often are also out of date and missing critical information. With this attack, Abrams recommends trying to recover the “shadow volume” copies some versions of Windows have.

Some ransomware does also sometimes targets backup files, though.

You should make multiple backups — to cloud services and using physical disk drives, at regular and frequent intervals. It’s a good idea to back up files to a drive that remains entirely disconnected from your network.

UPDATE AND PATCH YOUR SYSTEMS

The latest ransomware was successful because of a confluence of factors. Those include a known and highly dangerous security hole in Microsoft Windows, tardy users who didn’t apply Microsoft’s March software fix, and malware designed to spread quickly once inside university, business and government networks. Updating software will take care of some vulnerability.

“Hopefully people are learning how important it is to apply these patches,” said Darien Huss, a senior security research engineer for cybersecurity firm Proofpoint, who helped stem the reach of the weekend attack. “I hope that if another attack occurs, the damage will be a lot less. But there are obviously many, many computers out there and some people still, I feel, will not think that they need to patch their computer. So if an attack like this occurs again, there will still be infections.”

USE ANTIVIRUS SOFTWARE

Using antivirus software will at least protect you from the most basic, well-known viruses by scanning your system against the known fingerprints of these pests. Low-end criminals take advantage of less-savvy users with such known viruses, even though malware is constantly changing and antivirus is frequently days behind detecting it.

EDUCATE YOUR WORKFORCE

Basic protocol such as stressing that workers shouldn’t click on questionable links or open suspicious attachments can save headaches. System administrators should ensure that employees don’t have unnecessary access to parts of the network that aren’t critical to their work. This helps limit the spread of ransomware if hackers do get into your system.

IF HIT, DON’T WAIT AND SEE

Some organizations disconnect computers as a precautionary measure. Shutting down a network can prevent the continued encryption — and possible loss — of more files. Hackers will sometimes encourage you to keep your computer on and linked to the network, but don’t be fooled.

If you’re facing a ransom demand and locked out of your files, law enforcement and cybersecurity experts discourage paying ransoms because it gives incentives to hackers and pays for their future attacks. There’s also no guarantee all files will be restored. Many organizations without updated backups may decide that regaining access to critical files, such as customer data, and avoiding public embarrassment is worth the cost.

“My answer is, never pay the ransom,” Abrams said. “But at the same time, I also know that if you’re someone who’s been affected and you’ve lost all your children’s photographs or you’ve lost all your data or you lost your thesis, sometimes $300 is worth it, you know?”

Categories: Local KSN News

Police: Mom hits son who didn’t give her Mother’s Day card

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 16:13

SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) – Police in South Carolina say a woman has been arrested for hitting her young son after he gave a Mother’s Day card to his grandmother but not to her.

A Spartanburg Police Department report says Shontrell Murphy is charged with cruelty to children for hitting her son on the head Thursday. His age was not given. He was treated and released from a local hospital.

According to the report, the boy’s sister told police that Shontrell Murphy hit the boy hard because he gave his grandmother a card but not her. She then tore the card up.

Police say Shontrell Murphy has been released from the Spartanburg County Detention Center. It wasn’t clear Sunday if she has an attorney, and the number listed on the police report wasn’t working.

Categories: Local KSN News

One injured in central Kansas semi-truck accident

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 15:09

ELLSWORTH COUNTY, Kan. (KSNW) – Kansas Highway Patrik said an accident involving a semi-truck took place in Ellsworth County in the early afternoon Sunday.

The accident happened near the Vesper exit along eastbound I-70. No other vehicles were involved in the accident.

Ellsworth County dispatchers said the driver of the semi-truck was taken to the hospital to be treated for injuries.

The cause of the accident is unknown.

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Categories: Local KSN News

Seizure of Kansas student newspapers shone light on dispute

Sun, 05/14/2017 - 14:17

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) – A federal mediator is expected wade next month into the fray between administrators at Hutchinson Community College and student journalists that recently culminated with the seizure of newspapers and cancellation of media classes.

Suspended journalism professor Alan Montgomery said the mediator will hear the dispute on June 8.

His grievance, filed in March, alleges administrators interfered with contract provisions for academic freedom in teaching. It also contends the college used disciplinary proceedings to intimidate students who had written stories critical of the administration.

HCC President Carter File says he doesn’t care what is in the paper.

Montgomery filed the grievance before his April 28 suspension and cancellation of journalism classes and the newspaper’s temporary confiscation days later. The college later reversed its decision canceling the semester’s final issue.

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